Beverages

How to Celebrate National Coffee Day

September 29 is National Coffee Day in the United States. It is not a national paid holiday on par with Memorial Day and Labor Day, but we can work on that. In the meantime, we owe it to ourselves to make the most of National Coffee Day – both at home and at the office.

We can think of no better way to celebrate the day than bringing office coffee service into the workplace. Galaxie Coffee is here to help you with that. Whether you have never had coffee service before or you are looking to replace your current provider, let us talk.

While we wait for your call, here are some creative ways to celebrate National Coffee Day 2019:

Try a New Coffee

We will start small for those of you celebrating your first National Coffee Day this year. For you, the easiest way to celebrate is to just try a new coffee. Let’s say you normally drink only hot brewed coffee, and you only drink it black. You might want to try a delicious cold brew with just a hint of cream. You will discover it is an entirely different taste experience.

Take a Friend to a Coffee Shop

September 29 is a Sunday this year. That means most of us will not be working. Why not take advantage of the day off and spend some time with a friend at a local coffee shop? There may be no better way to celebrate National Coffee Day than investing in a friendly conversation over a hot cup. It will be time well spent.

Go in Search of a Great Deal

Many of the other holidays we celebrate involve shopping of some sort. You can apply the same thing to National Coffee Day by searching around town for the best coffee deals you can find. Make a game of it. Challenge your friends or coworkers to see who can come up with the best deal. Whoever wins gets to share his or her find with the rest of the group.

Go on a Coffee Crawl

There are food crawls and pub crawls, so why not a coffee crawl? Spend the day visiting as many cafés, bistros, and restaurants you can in search of that perfect cup of java. If you are feeling especially festive, try writing a short review of each establishment you visit. You can then share those reviews with your friends and family members.

Buy a Cup for Someone Special

Another fantastic way to celebrate National Coffee Date is to buy a cup of coffee for someone special. It’s amazing how just one little act of kindness can mean so much, even when that act is wrapped in a paper coffee cup. You could make a real difference in someone’s life just by showing you care enough to buy them a coffee.

There are endless other ways to celebrate National Coffee Day. In the meantime, let us talk about getting Galaxie Coffee service up and running at your office.

Does Cold Brew Offer the Same Health Benefits?

Cold brew coffee is all the rage these days. It is a favorite among younger coffee drinkers looking to change things up from what their parents and grandparents did. And in the summer, nothing is quite as refreshing as a delicious cup of cold brew.

Two questions we want to pose in this post are as follows: does cold brew offer the same benefits as hot brew coffee? And if not, is it worth skipping the cold brew in order to get the maximum benefit from hot coffee?

Cold Brew Basics

Let us start with some basics before we get to answering the questions. First and foremost, cold brew is not the same thing as iced coffee. Iced coffee is brewed hot. It is then chilled in the refrigerator or poured directly into a cup and chilled with ice cubes.

Cold brew is brewed with cold or room temperature water. Brewing typically takes 12 to 14 hours and results in a less acidic coffee with a more balanced flavor.

The Health Benefits Question

Moving on to the health benefits of coffee, studies have already established that drinking moderate amounts of hot coffee may reduce the risk of a number of diseases including heart disease, liver disease, and type II diabetes. Researchers think the benefits are primarily derived from antioxidants and caffeine.

A recently released study shows that cold brew does not contain the same volume of antioxidants. In fact, the difference can be as much as 50% in some cases. Caffeine content in cold brew is also not as high. Why? Because caffeine is soluble in water. You extract more caffeine with hot water than you do using cold water.

The study suggests that the health benefits of cold brew should be fewer because both antioxidants and caffeine occur at lower volumes. However, bear in mind the study did not track cold brew drinkers and their health. All it did was measure acid, antioxidant, and caffeine levels.

What to Do with It

Let us close this post by discussing whether or not you should forgo cold brew. In short, it is entirely up to you. Bear in mind that all of the studies demonstrating the health benefits of coffee are epidemiological studies. In other words, they show links between coffee consumption and reduced risk for certain diseases. But links do not establish causation.

If you are sold on the health benefits of coffee to the extent that you want to maximize every cup, foregoing cold brew might be in your best interests. But if you enjoy the balanced, less acidic taste of cold brew enough to settle for fewer antioxidants and less caffeine, keep drinking it.

Here at Galaxie Coffee, we have both. We are more than happy to stock your break room in any way you like. We carry traditional hot brewed coffees, cold brews, teas, juices, and bottled water. Feel free to check out the Products section of our website to see our complete inventory.

How Different Coffees Vary in Their Caffeine Content

If your daily diet includes foods and beverages with caffeine, you are not alone. Government data shows that 95% of U.S. adults consume caffeine daily, most of which comes from coffee. What is most fascinating is that different kinds of coffees have varying levels of caffeine.

The U.S. FDA says a typical 8-ounce cup of coffee offers anywhere from 80 to 100 mg of caffeine. Compare that to green or black tea with 30 to 50 mg. Soft drinks offer less caffeine but energy drinks contain substantially more.

Given that this post is all about coffee, here are some of the different coffee types and the estimated amounts of caffeine each contains:

Hot Brew

Hot brew coffee is coffee that is brewed in a conventional drip brewer or over the stove on a percolator. The ground coffee is kept separate from the brew by way of a metal or paper filter. A typical 8-ounce cup contains about 95 mg of caffeine.

Cold Brew

Cold brew coffee is the latest big thing on the coffee scene. Cold brew is made by steeping ground coffee in cold or room temperature water. As such, cold brew is not the same thing as iced coffee. As far as its caffeine content is concerned, an 8-ounce cup contains between 100 and 157 mg of caffeine.

Espresso

Espresso is the extra strong brew normally associated with Italian cafés. It is made by steaming finely ground coffee under pressure. Due to its high caffeine content, espresso is normally served in 1-ounce shots with approximately 63 mg of the buzz-inducing substance.

Decaffeinated Coffee

Many people assume that decaffeinated coffee has absolutely no caffeine in it. Unfortunately, that is not the case. It is not really possible to completely remove caffeine from coffee and still have a usable product. So instead, coffee makers reduce caffeine content as best they can without ruining the coffee’s flavor profile. A typical 8-ounce cup contains about 2 mg.

Instant Coffee

Instant coffee is a powdered coffee beverage that is made by freeze drying or spray-drying liquid coffee. It is reconstituted by adding water or milk. A typical 8-ounce cup contains about 63 mg of caffeine, which is just over two thirds of what you would expect to find in regular, hot brewed coffee.

Roasting and Preparation Methods Matter

If you haven’t caught on thus far, roasting and preparation methods matter in terms of caffeine content. For example, the high caffeine content in espresso is less about the coffee beans and more about the fact that it is prepared using high-pressure steam and finely ground coffee. Steam extracts more caffeine to begin with; its abilities are enhanced by the coffee’s finer grind.

Galaxie Coffee carries a complete variety of coffee beverages ranging from standard drip coffees to cold brews. We would be more than happy to set up regular delivery service to your office that includes a variety of hot and cold beverages, breakroom supplies, and janitorial supplies.

The Evolution of Office Coffee in America

Having coffee in the office is a normal part of work life in America. In fact, long before coffee houses became a thing in this country, groups of workers were chipping in at the office to make sure there was a regular supply of coffee on hand. Today, not having coffee in the office is rare.

The question is, how did we get here? That depends on who you ask. Historians generally agree on how coffee made it to the Americas and what made it popular here. But what took coffee into the office remains a matter of debate.

Coffee Replaces Tea

Tea was the preferred hot beverage from the birth of the colonies right up until the start of the Revolutionary War. From the end of the revolution through the Civil War, coffee’s popularity grew in the U.S. By the mid-1860s, smart business owners whose coffee sales were limited to families and small coffee houses started looking for bigger and better sales avenues.

Some started selling to cowboys out west while others tapped into California’s mining market. Still, having coffee in the office didn’t quite catch on. The office environment was still quite limited back then, and offices were not large buildings with hundreds of employees. They were one- and two-room spaces occupied by family-run businesses.

Then came the industrial era and two world wars. That is when large-scale employment and the offices that came with it began to flourish. It is when office coffee finally came into its own.

From Instant to Drip Brew

History is pretty clear on the evolution of coffee up through the start of the industrial era. This is where it gets a bit fuzzy. As best we can tell, office coffee became a thing in the years following World War II. That makes sense, given the big push toward industry and manufacturing. But office coffee in those days was instant coffee.

It was not until Starbucks came onto the scene in the 1970s that coffee providers realized they could install brewing equipment in customer offices to offer them the same high-quality technologically advanced equipment experience they got at the coffee house. Once the equipment started flowing, so did the coffee.

By the late 70s and early 80s, instant coffee in the office had been mostly replaced by drip brew. Coffee service providers like Galaxie Coffee started popping up all over the country. Advancements in technology led to better brewers, better coffees, and eventually the coffee pods we are also familiar with today.

Office Coffee is Still Evolving

It would be foolish for us to assume that office coffee is done evolving. It isn’t, and never will be. Our industry continues to innovate and change. We continually search for better beverages and more technologically advanced equipment.

If you are interested in learning about coffee service for your office, feel free to reach out to us. Galaxie Coffee is proud to serve the greater New York area with the finest beverages and best equipment in the industry.

Coffee and Alcohol: A Match Made in Heaven?

We have entered that strange time of year when it is hard to decide between a hot cup of coffee and a cold beer. You love both; so much so that you cannot decide between one or the other. Why not have both. But together in the same beverage? Yes, you can.

You could make the case that coffee and alcohol are a match made in heaven. One gives you the kick of caffeine along with an aroma that is unmatched by any other beverage. The other gives you the deep, rich flavor of barley and hops combined in a perfect pairing. Together… well, watch out!

The Coffee Beer Revolution

The marriage between craft beer and coffee wasn’t on anyone’s radar 10 years ago. It is now. Go to any major city and dig around until you find a craft brewery. Chances are you will find an artisan coffee shop somewhere within reasonable proximity. You might even find the two establishments swapping beverages.

There are two ways to make a coffee beer. The first is to add ground coffee directly to a beer batch during the fermenting process. This gives the beer a very dark and robust flavor that really allows the coffee to do magical things. Different coffees can be used to achieve different flavors.

The other option is to add cold brew coffee to finished beer. This creates a more subtle taste that still allows the beer flavor to dominate the show. On the positive side, cold brew is not nearly as acidic as drip brew, so it doesn’t drastically alter the taste of beer.

Introducing the New Coffee Cocktails

Coffee cocktail drinks date back to the Irish coffees and white Russians of the 1950s and 60s. However, there is a new coffee cocktail scene emerging in the nation’s biggest cultural centers. Right here in New York for example, coffee cocktails are the hottest thing at upscale bars, nightclubs, and restaurants.

Talented mixologists are combining traditional coffee and espresso with alcoholic beverages like brandy, vodka, angostura bitters, hazelnut liqueur, and even absinthe. Some of these drinks will knock your socks off – and then some. They are the perfect way to finish off a great meal or prepare for the first round of hors d’oeuvres.

Not Just for Breakfast Anymore

We are not serving coffee beer or coffee cocktails here at Galaxie Coffee. No, we will stick with nonalcoholic beverages including the best coffees, teas, juices, and bottled water. In the meantime, remember that coffee is not just for breakfast anymore. It is appropriate anytime of the day and in a variety of forms – from classic drip brew to cold brew and coffee beers and cocktails.

Galaxie Coffee is proud to be an office coffee service leader throughout the greater New York area. Please contact us for more information about setting up service for your workplace. We supply both the beverages and equipment to make your office a happier, more delicious place to work.

What is the Best Time to Drink Your Coffee?

We would be willing to wager that most of our customers utilizing traditional hot brew coffee machines get a fresh pot of coffee going first thing in the morning. Our single cup customers begin seeing the coffee capsules flying as soon as staff members start arriving for the day. With that said, here is a question: what is the best time of day to drink your coffee?

As strange as it sounds, the question is not random. It has been suggested drinking coffee first thing in the morning may not be the wisest choice if you are hoping to realize the maximum benefits from your beverage of choice. Waiting a few hours might be better.

Coffee, Caffeine, and Cortisol

Many studies have been done explaining the health benefits of drinking coffee. Some research indicates that getting the greatest health benefits out of coffee is likely influenced by the time of day you consume. Apparently, coffee consumption is best when cortisol levels in the body are low. The lower the cortisol, the better coffee is for you. The interesting thing is that the body starts producing cortisol the minute you wake up.

90 Minutes to Peak

It takes roughly 90 minutes from the time you wake up for cortisol levels to peak. So if you wake at 6:30, your body will peak somewhere between 8 and 9 a.m. Your body will then hit another peak somewhere between noon and 1 p.m., and then again between 5:30 and 6:30 p.m., making each of these times perfect for that cup of office coffee.

The point here is that perhaps it is better to wait until after cortisol levels peak before having that first cup in the morning. Researchers suggest that consuming earlier not only reduces the benefits of coffee but could also make you more tired at the same time.

Great Coffee Any Time of Day

Thankfully, there is no right or wrong time to drink coffee. Even better is the fact that there are great coffees for any time of day. Start your workday with a great cup of hot brew as you plot and plan for the next eight hours. Grab a cold brew at lunch to complement the great sandwich you brought from home. Avoid ‘leaded’ in the afternoon so as to not keep yourself up at night, choosing a delicious decaf coffee instead.

We have them all here at Galaxie Coffee. Our product list includes dozens of different coffees for traditional equipment and the newest single-serve brewers. Along with great coffee, we also provide our customers the finest teas, juices, and bottled waters.

It looks like first thing in the morning is not the best time to drink coffee if you want to maximize its health benefits. Even so, any time of day is appropriate to enjoy a good cup of coffee just for what it is.

3 Interesting Facts About Paper Coffee Cups

The paper coffee cup has almost all but replaced foam cups in many parts of the country. In New York City, a law passed in 2015 banned the use of foam food containers within city limits. Elsewhere, local and state leaders have taken steps to reduce the use of foam products by encouraging businesses to switch to alternatives.

Here at Galaxie Coffee, we are big fans of paper coffee cups. Our customers are too. In light of all that the paper coffee cup has done to reduce the amount of foam going into landfills, we thought it might be interesting to discuss three facts about paper coffee cups a lot of people don’t know.

1. They used to be sealed with clay or wax

Paper drinking cups have been around for quite a while. In fact, their roots can be traced back to the early 1900s and high rates of infection among schoolchildren and train station passengers who used community cups. The obvious need to put an end to those infections gave us single-use paper cups.

The first single-use paper cup was developed at the turn of the 20th century. Its success led to the Dixie cup’s introduction in 1908. Back then, paper cups were sealed with clay in order to make them waterproof.

Unfortunately, clay distorted the flavor of the beverage being consumed. It also caused problems with condensation on the exterior, leading manufacturers to transition to wax. Wax solved the flavor problem quite nicely. However, it didn’t do much for the condensation problem. So manufacturers kept looking for a better sealant.

2. They are now sealed with PE

Manufacturers eventually hit on the idea of sealing paper cups with a thin layer of polyethylene (PE). Because polyethylene is a plastic, it makes the inside of the cup waterproof and prevents significant condensation on the exterior. PE also holds up better than both wax and clay against hot liquids. Indeed, polyethylene paved the way for paper coffee cups that were unheard of before it was introduced.

As a side note, a new sealant was introduced in Finland in 2017. It is fully compostable and decomposes much more quickly than polyethylene. It also does not contaminate the recycling stream so there is no problem throwing paper coffee cups coated with this sealant in with other recyclable products.

3. They are often made with recycled paper

Finally, single-use paper coffee cups are often made from recycled paper. Manufacturers prefer virgin paper for any cup with a surface that comes in direct contact with food or liquid, but that’s not an issue for coffee cups sealed with polyethylene. That makes recycled paper a more attractive option.

Paper coffee cups are just one of the many products we provide customer throughout the greater New York area. For a complete list of our products and services, give us a call. One of our customer service representatives would be more than happy to discuss your office coffee needs with you.

5 Regions Whose Coffee You Should Try in 2019

If you have ever heard someone speaking about the flavor notes of coffee and thought that person was just being snooty, think again. Snootiness may have been part of the equation, but coffees from different regions of the world do taste quite different from each other.

To this end, we encourage you to sample some brews from various regions around the world. If you can get beyond traditional American coffee, you realize that there is an entire range of subtleties and flavor notes that define what is arguably the world’s most popular beverage. To get you started, here are five regions whose coffees we recommend you try this year:

1. East Africa

The two most prolific coffee producers in East Africa are Ethiopia and Kenya. History suggests that Ethiopia is the birthplace of coffee, though that has never been conclusively proven. At any rate, Ethiopian coffee tends to be bold, full flavored, and rich with earthy notes. Kenyan coffee, by contrast, tends to be sharp and fruity. It also has a very rich aroma that sets it apart from other African coffees.

2. Central America

Guatemalan coffee is the most recognized coffee from Central America. Its rich, distinctive flavor comes from the volcanic soil the region is known for. Guatemalan coffee is deep and complex with a somewhat spicy flavor. If you are looking for something with medium body and more balance, try coffee from Costa Rica. A combination of regional weather and processing practices give this coffee a distinct flavor.

3. South America

Colombia and Brazil are two popular sources of South American coffees. In fact, Colombian coffee is considered in some circles as the standard by which all others are judged. Both regions are known for medium-bodied coffee with good balance and low acidity.

4. Asia

Though we do not normally associate Asia with high quality coffee, some exceptionally good coffees come from Indonesia and Vietnam. Indonesian coffees tend to be aged over time, resulting in medium body and low acid content. Coffee from Vietnam is mild, slightly acidic, and well-balanced. It is a frequent choice for blending.

5. Hawaii

Although Hawaii is a state rather than a region, no list of this sort would be complete without recommending Kona coffee. Kona is a uniquely Hawaiian coffee grown on the slopes of an active volcano. Hawaii’s climate provides natural cloud cover during the afternoon hours and just enough rain on a daily basis to create a rich, delicious flavor unlike anything else.

Needless to say that the regions listed in this post only scratch the surface. There are dozens of countries around the world where dedicated growers are producing some excellent beans. Just remember that processing, roasting, and blending all affect the overall taste of a cup of coffee.

If you would like more information about bringing coffee service to your office, feel free to contact us at your leisure. Galaxie Coffee is proud to serve the tri-state area with a fine selection of coffees, teas, and other beverage choices.

Embrace the Winter Season with Traditional Drip Coffee

Coffee trends come and go with the passing seasons. But if you stop and think about it, you come to the realization that traditional drip coffee has withstood the test of time. While other fads fade away with waning consumer trends, traditional drip coffee continues to be served at home, in offices, and at nearly every restaurant and café in the U.S.

We think that winter is a great season to get back to traditional drip coffee. In fact, setting aside those cold coffee drinks and designer concoctions with strange names in favor of drip coffee is a wonderful way to embrace this time of year.

Old School Brew

There is no doubt that drip coffee is definitely old school. Slow drip brewing dates back to the early days of pour-overs and stove-top percolators. It is what we Americans grew up on, at least where coffee is concerned. But here’s the thing: being old-school doesn’t mean drip brewing gives you inferior coffee.

We have a tendency to think that anything old is not as good as newer alternatives. That is not necessarily true. Traditional drip coffee is not better or worse than any other kind of coffee. It is just different. And yes, it’s still very good. A delicious cup of old-school drip coffee is a perfect way to start the day or finish off a meal.

Secrets to Great Traditional Drip Coffee

It has been our experience that one of the reasons traditional drip coffee has such a bad reputation is that we have lost the skill of making and storing it correctly. It is like anything else. Without the skill and knowledge, you do not produce the same quality.

Great drip coffee starts with the right water temperature. Ideally, drip machines should heat water to somewhere between 195 and 205°F. If the water is too cold, it will not extract enough of the ground coffee’s oil to give you the full-bodied flavor you want. If it is too hot – particularly if it’s boiling – the water will burn the coffee.

Once coffee is brewed, it should be placed in an insulated carafe or a thermos. As you know, leaving coffee on a hot plate or burner ruins the flavor in short order. Why? Because the high heat burns the coffee. Along those same lines, traditional drip coffee should be consumed within a couple of hours. If it’s not, and you put it in the refrigerator overnight, reheating it in the morning will drastically change its flavor.

Galaxie Coffee and Brewers

Are you looking for something to get you and your office through the last few weeks of winter? If so, we invite you to embrace a good cup of traditional drip coffee. Here at Galaxie Coffee, we have both the coffee and brewers you need to equip your office.

Winter is the best time of year for traditional drip coffee. The coffee is hot, delicious, and very comforting. For more information about adding coffee service to your office, contact us today.

January 11 is National Milk Day – What Milk Do You Prefer?

Did you know the January 11 is National Milk Day here in the U.S.? What’s more, Global Milk Day is celebrated on June 1. It would appear as though milk has worldwide appeal despite having so many sources, which leads us to ask another question: what kind of milk do you prefer?

For classification purposes, milk can be described as either animal or plant-based. Animal milks come from the mammary glands of mammals. We are talking cows, goats, etc. Plant milks are derived by processing the plants from which they come. Examples include rice, soy, almond, and coconut milk.

More About Animal Milk

As you most probably know from school, females of every mammal species produce milk. In fact, the ability to do so is one of the characteristics that defines what a mammal is. Having said that, most of the animal milk sold commercially (85%) comes from cows.

That doesn’t necessarily mean cow milk is good for every person. Indeed, some people are allergic to it while others cannot drink cow milk due to lactose intolerance. Fortunately, there are other animal milks that consumers can buy, though the availability of which may vary from one region to the next. The most commonly bought milks after cow milk are buffalo, goat, camel, sheep, and yak milk.

Animal milk is also processed into a variety of dairy products including butter, cream, and cheese. It is interesting to note that the European Union passed regulations in 2013 prohibiting manufacturers of plant milk products from using dairy associated terms like ‘butter’ and ‘cheese’ to describe their products. The FDA has considered a similar ban here, but no action has been taken as of yet.

More About Plant Milk

Unlike animal milk, which can be obtained simply by accessing the mammary glands of the animal in question, plant milk must be made by combining the chosen plant material with water. The process is fairly simple though. You could even make your favorite plant milk at home if you really wanted to.

Among the many types of plant milk, three of the most popular right now are soy, almond, and coconut. Soy milk is similar to cow milk in its appearance, thickness, and texture. Its taste varies somewhat based on the cultivar of soybean and the production process.

Almond milk is the most popular of the plant milks, probably due to its variety. It can be purchased as unsweetened, sweetened, and flavored (e.g., vanilla and chocolate). As for coconut milk, it is naturally sweet and loaded with healthy fats and oils. It’s great straight up or as an ingredient for cooking.

Galaxie Coffee is more than happy to supply our customers with a variety of milk products. If you are not yet using a coffee service for your office, we invite you to contact us today to learn more about our services and products. Otherwise, we wish you well and encourage you to celebrate National Milk Day on January 11 with a tall, cold glass of your favorite milk.